Tag Archives: Japan

Does going viral on Twitter actually drive purchase?


In Japan, Glico has conducted a campaign naming Nov 11 as “The Day of Pocky” since two consecutive 11 numbers looks similar to the visual of four Pockies. They have urged people to tweet on Nov 11 with the keyword of “Pocky” to achieve the status of “the most tweeted brand within 24 hours” in Guinness record.

Tweet visual saying “Congrats for 3710044 tweets!”

With the efforts of driving this with promo-tweet, they successfully got 371,0044 tweets and officially certified as Guinness record. Such “The Day of Pocky” was started in 1999 (so long ago!) and they were successful in creating another day in the year to have sales spike other than Valentine’s Day (and White Day when guys give gift back to girls in return of Valentine’s Day).

What Twitter Japan is claiming now in its recent post is; those who purchased Pocky on Nov 11 is outstandingly higher (4 times more than previous week’s average) among Twitter users (in blue) than among non-Twitter users (in gray) presumably as a effect of exposing tweets about The Day of Pocky.

# of Pocky Purchasers per 10,000 people (Gray is Twitter non-users, Blue is Twitter users)

Also, the claim; not only among those people who actually tweeted about Pocky, but also among those people who just “saw” Pocky tweet had higher chance of purchasing Pocky. (The left group is those who didn’t see Pocky tweet, the center group is those who saw Pocky tweet and the right group is those who tweeted about Pocky; everything is the comparison between pre-campaign and post-campaign.)

% of Pocky purchase in past 1 week (Gray is pre-campaign, Blue is post campaign)

While above data still has a room for further analysis, we can probably admit that 1) artificially creating campaign for the brand works, 2) driving tweet for one specific event would indirectly drive purchase. Often times, social media does not have clear answer to its ROI and just because of that, it is often hard to rationalize investment. However, this learning would definitely a starting point of quantifying social media’s business contribution.

Especially given the Twitter popularity in Japan, this is a positive learning to reapply!

Reference: https://blog.twitter.com/ja/2014/tuitonokuo-san-hashi-ji-nigou-mai-wocu-jin-saserukotogadekirunoka

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Sony hopes for music service upswing as it sells 5.3M PS4s


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http://gigaom.com/2014/02/18/sony-hopes-for-music-service-upswing-as-it-sells-5-3m-ps4s/

PS4-unboxed
Summary:Sony is launching the PS4 in Japan this week, and the company hopes that video gamers there will also try out its music service.

Sony has sold 5.3 million PS4s since it first introduced the game console in November of 2013, and now it’s hoping that all those new PS4 owners won’t just play games with the device.

Sony has especially high hopes for its music subscription service, dubbed Sony Music Unlimited. The Spotify competitor may not be very well known outside the Sony universe, but Anu Kirk, director of music services at Sony Entertainment, told me recently that the service has seen some significant usage uptick since the PS4 launch. PS4 users were responsible for 38 percent of all streams in January, Kirk said.

Kirk also told me that Sony Music Unlimited’s subscriber growth rate more than doubled since the launch of the PS4, but declined to comment on how many subscribers the service currently has. In the U.S., Sony’s service is believed to be far behind competitors like Spotify and Muve Music.

However, the situation is a bit different in Japan, where Spotify and others haven’t launched yet, making Sony the only major international subscription service. That’s why the company has high hopes for the launch of the PS4 in Japan next weekend, with Kirk telling me that his team has been preparing to bring music subscriptions to all those Japanese gamers as well.

The key here is to understand the local market, which is very different from other countries. “People listen to a lot more local music in Japan,” he said.

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How Frontback Is Getting Popular in Japan


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While today’s update is a significant one for photo-sharing app Frontback, something unexpected is happening as well — Frontback is blowing up in Japan, China and Brazil. In fact, the app is now more popular in these countries than in the U.S.

“In the U.S., people are using Frontback for important events like the Superbowl to make a statement and share what they are doing,” co-founder and CEO Frédéric della Faille told me in a phone interview. “In Japan, people found a way to express themselves through the app, and it’s very different,” he continued.

A Frontback post is a very restrictive form of expression. In some way, taking a Frontback is the visual equivalent of writing a Haiku. There are some artistic rules that you need to follow — it’s short and self-contained. But after that, the sky is the limit.

In Japan, the community has recently decided to self-organize. On February 24, there will be a Japan Frontback meetup. One of the attendees will be Himesora, a Frontback power user who really took advantage of the platform.

She loves art, cartoons and graffiti. She always carries with her a binder with fake paper eyes. Every time she wants to take a Frontback, she pulls the appropriate pair of cartoon eyes and put them on her glasses. In other words, she has created a character for Frontback. You can see the result at the top of this article.

And with the global feed, people all around the world noticed her. They started interacting with her. In the U.S., Mexico and South America, Frontback users have engaged with Himesora — they reply using selfies and captions.

Frontback Community 2

“The non-product team is composed of two persons right now, that’s a quarter of the team,” della Faille said. “We are realizing that when you are dealing with a public graph, you need to provide inspiration to fight timidity. That’s why we are doing staff picks as well. We want to show the true face of the world, with a smile.”

Other users are using Frontback for very specific purposes. For example, Tamkai transforms his daily life into drawings. Willie Myers wants to tell stories using only two pictures.

While Frontback created a new medium, the team is only realizing now the power of this photo format.

“There is something deeply personal about the experience sharing and viewing community member profiles daily in the public space,” community manager Elissa Patel wrote in an email. “All of these photos fall into the category of no filter, no cropping, no photoshop — real people with real stories.”

Frontback Meetup

http://techcrunch.com/2014/02/13/how-frontback-is-getting-popular-in-japan/

The Past, The Future & What This Means For Our Developing World.


Peter Thiel SXSW

There are four quadrants used to organize the past and the future views of the developing world.  These quadrants are optimistic, pessimistic, determinate and indeterminate.

optimistic139009150158316

China is currently thought to be pessimistic/determinate meaning it has a clear view of where it would like to be in twenty years but at the same time China is worried about whether or not they will get there in this modern time frame.  China is more likely to save money, then invest money over the next few decades.

“China will be a somewhat poorer version of the developed world, people will become old before they become rich”  –  Peter Thiel, Co-founder, PayPal.

America is thought to have fell in to a quadrant called indeterminate optimism.  Presently, the United States is believed to have both a low amount of investment and a low amount of saving, this is arguably the most unstable position for a country to be in.

“One of the strange things about indeterminate optimism is that its the quadrant that has low savings and low investment.  Is it possible for the future to be better when no one saves and no one invests? Because no one is thinking and everyone is outsourcing all of the thinking to other people.”  –  Peter Thiel, Co-Founder, PayPal.

Both Japan and Europe are thought to be indeterminate/pessimistic meaning the future does not look bright and no body is sure what to do about it.

Asian shares tumble to three-week low on China services PMI


By Dominic Lau

TOKYO Mon Jan 6, 2014 2:11am EST

1 of 7. A man walks against strong wind and rain in front of a stock quotation board outside a brokerage in Tokyo October 2, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Toru Hanai

(Reuters) – Asian shares fell to a three-week low on Monday after growth in China’s services sector slowed sharply last month, raising concerns about the pace of recovery in the world’s second-largest economy, while safe-haven gold climbed.

The dollar hovered near a four-week high, supported by an upbeat outlook for the U.S. economy from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke that supported expectations of faster stimulus reduction by the U.S. central bank.

British, German and French shares .FTSE .GDAXI .FCHI were expected to open steady to modestly softer, according to financial bookmakers.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan .MIAPJ0000PUS shed 0.8 percent, reaching a three-week low and adding to a 1.1 percent drop on Friday. The gauge lost 1.7 percent last year, sharply underperforming U.S., Japanese and European stocks.

China’s CSI300 index .CSI300 sagged 2.3 percent, hitting a five-month low after the HSBC/Markit services sector Purchasing Managers’ Index fell to 50.9 in December from 52.5 in the previous month, with new business expansion the slowest in six months. [ID:nB9N0JK02G] The Chinese index is down 3.9 percent since the start of the year, adding to last year’s 7.6 percent decline.

“The focal point of the Asian markets is more on Chinese growth and on Chinese political situation and how it’s going to pan out this year, rather than worrying about how tapering will affect Asia specifically,” said Guy Stear, Asian credit and equity strategist at Societe Generale in Hong Kong, referring to the manufacturing PMI released last week.

South Korea’s won hit a near six-week low of 1,067.7 to a dollar on China slowdown fears.

Driven by heightened political uncertainty ahead of next month’s general election, the Thai baht fell to a near four-year trough of 33.11 per dollar and Thai stocks .SETI dropped 1.1 percent after earlier falling by as much as 1.6 percent to touch a 16-month low.

In terms of valuations, Thai equities were relatively expensive, with the 12-month forward price-to-earnings ratio of 11.9, slightly ahead of a five-year average of 11.4 and the MSCI Asia-Pacific ex-Japan’s 11.7, Thomson Reuters Datastream data showed.

ROUGH START FOR NIKKEI

Japan’s Nikkei .N225 stumbled 2.4 percent, marking its worst one-day fall in two months, in the first trading day of 2014. The benchmark jumped 57 percent last year to log its best annual rise since 1972 on the back of massive fiscal and monetary stimulus.

As Japanese equities took a beating, the yen got some respite against the dollar, up 0.6 percent at 104.28 yen, not far from a two-week high of 104.08 yen touched last Friday.

Against a basket of major currencies, the dollar .DXY added 0.1 percent to near a four-week high set on Friday, helped by Bernanke’s comments.

Bernanke, who steps down as head of the Fed at month’s end, gave an upbeat assessment of the U.S. economy in coming quarters, but he tempered the good news in housing, finance and fiscal policies by repeating that the overall recovery “clearly remains incomplete”.

U.S. stocks ended last week slightly weaker, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 .SPX down 0.5 percent for the week after it jumped 30 percent in 2013. .N

U.S. JOBS, ECB THIS WEEK

Friday’s nonfarm payrolls data will give further clues as to how well the U.S. economy is recovering and how fast the Fed will unwind its stimulus campaign, which has been a major driver for global assets in the past few years.

“With the Fed having set the tapering process in motion, it would likely take a fairly significant miss to derail tapering expectations and push yields significantly lower from their year-end levels,” analysts at BNP Paribas wrote in a note.

“Against this backdrop, the dollar is likely to remain generally well-supported this week, particularly versus the lower-yielding G10 currencies,” they added.

Before the jobs report on Friday, investors will focus on the minutes of the Fed’s December policy meeting, due out on Jan 8, and the European Central Bank’s policy gathering on Thursday.

The euro was down 0.1 percent at $1.3579, building on the previous session’s 0.6 percent decline.

Among commodities, gold advanced 0.4 percent a near three-week high of about $1,241 an ounce, heading for a fifth day of gains. The precious metal suffered a 28 percent slump in 2013, its worst yearly performance since 1981, largely due to the Fed’s plan to unwind its stimulus program.

U.S. crude futures edged up 0.1 percent to just above $94 a barrel, coming off a four-week low set on Friday after data showed a larger-than-expected build in distillates.

(Additional reporting by Lisa Twaronite in Tokyo and Jongwoo Cheon in Singapore; Editing by Edwina Gibbs and Eric Meijer)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/06/us-markets-global-idUSBRE96S00E20140106

Asia shares roiled by risk aversion; gold gains


By Wayne Cole

SYDNEY Thu Jan 2, 2014 9:36pm EST

An office worker walks past the board of the Australian Securities Exchange building displaying its logo in central Sydney April 5, 2013. REUTERS-Daniel Munoz
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York, December 27, 2013. REUTERS-Carlo Allegri
A pedestrian holding an umbrella walks past an electronic board displaying graphs of the recenent movement of Japan's Nikkei average outside a brokerage in Tokyo December 19, 2013. REUTERS-Yuya Shino

1 of 5. An office worker walks past the board of the Australian Securities Exchange building displaying its logo in central Sydney April 5, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Daniel Munoz

(Reuters) – Asian share markets were under water on Friday after a sudden reversal in some very popular, and thus crowded, trades sparked a bout of global risk aversion.

The net result was a pullback in the euro, sterling, and stocks and a bounce for the yen, gold and bonds. Oil prices had also taken a spill, though for purely idiosyncratic reasons.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan .MIAPJ0000PUS shed a sharp 1.3 percent, with markets from Shanghai to Sydney all in the red.

The various moves seemed divorced from the news flow, which was mostly upbeat with global manufacturing ending 2013 on a strong note as the United States, Japan and Germany all saw demand pick up. <TOP/CEN>

The fly in the ointment was China where a measure of activity in the services sector eased back in December, just as one for manufacturing had on Thursday.

The next hurdle later Friday will be a spate of speeches from top Federal Reserve policy makers, including outgoing Chairman Ben Bernanke. Any comments on the outlook for tapering could affect market sentiment.

On Thursday, the Dow .DJI had ended down 0.82 percent while the S&P 500 .SPX lost 0.89 percent. MSCI’s 45-country share index .MIWD00000PUS slipped 1 percent.

Anxious eyes were fixed on Thailand after the stock market sank over 5 percent .SETI on Thursday amid deepening political uncertainty. The Thai currency also took a bath, hitting its lowest since early 2010 at 33.03 per dollar.

Shares in South Korea .KS11 lost another 1.2 percent, though there the problem was one of a strong won and a weak yen undermining the competitiveness of the country’s huge export companies.

Samsung Electronics Co Ltd (005930.KS) was down over 1 percent, on top of a 5 percent decline on Thursday, and at its lowest since August.

The country’s Finance Minister, Hyun Oh-seok, reiterated that they were closely watching the won and the ongoing depreciation of the yen, but went no further than that.

EURO SETBACK

In currencies, the euro took a spill as speculators booked profits on long positions after a strong 2013. The single currency was stuck at $1.3657 after shedding a full cent overnight.

The same forces gripped sterling, another strong performer in recent months. The pound peeled away to $1.6441 from a 28-month peak of $1.6605.

That in turn lifted the U.S. dollar index, a gauge of the greenback’s value against six major currencies, by the most in five months. On Friday, the index was at 80.595 .DXY compared to a trough of 80.083 the day before.

Going the other way, the yen enjoyed a short-covering bounce. Borrowing in yen to buy higher yielding assets has been a vastly popular trade, leaving the market vulnerable to sudden, if usually brief, reversals.

In this case the dollar came off to 104.65 yen after being as high as 105.44, its strongest level since October 2008. Likewise, the euro retreated to 143.00 yen from a peak of 145.12 on Thursday.

The short-covering theme extended to U.S. Treasury debt, which has been under pressure for pretty much all of the past two months. Yields on the 10-year note dipped to 2.99 percent from a top of 3.04 percent, which had been the highest since mid-2011.

Gold was another beaten-down asset to get a reprieve. The metal swung up to $1,229.84 having been as low as $1,183.80 early in the week. <GOL/>

Oil prices steadied after taking a fall on Thursday as Libya prepared to restart a major oilfield and on speculation of a sharp rise in crude stockpiles in the United States.

Brent crude edged up 32 cents to $108.10 a barrel but that followed a drop of $2.98 on Thursday. U.S. crude was up 20 cents at $95.64, having shed almost $5 the day before.

(Editing by Eric Meijer)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/03/us-markets-global-idUSBRE96S00E20140103

What Product Managers can learn from Jiro Ono


Jiro ono of jiro dreams of sushi

Jiro ono of jiro dreams of sushi

Hiring, quality assurance and leadership.

This post is part of the ‘What Product Managers can learn from …’ series. It is also published in the Startup Edition.

Just recently I re-watched Jiro Dreams of Sushi, a wonderful documentary about Jiro Ono, an 85 year old sushi chef from Japan who leads a tiny 8 seat sushi bar located in a Tokyo subway station. It repeatedly got awarded with 3 out of 3 Michelin stars and is known as the best place in the world to get sushi.

I first stumbled upon the documentary a few months back when Jason Evanish published his own recommendation. Since then I’ve seen it a couple of times on various occasions and it always is a true joy to watch.

I believe as Product Managers we all can learn a lot from Jiro, especially when it comes to hard nuts to crack like hiring, quality assurance and leadership …

Strive for Perfection

Who defines when something is ‘good enough’? Who cares?

We live in a world of ‘good enough’. People talk about diminishing returns, finding the sweet spot and 80/20.

We easily forget that in order to create something that truly stands out and delights customers it takes vision, passion and standards that are way beyond ‘standard’.

I would make sushi in my dreams. — Jiro Ono

Often you will have to set your own standards since ‘industry standard’ or being ‘better than the competition’ will cause you to aim way lower than you could.

I feel this is the reason why sometimes whole industries get disrupted by people who are ‘outsiders’ that naively expected way more than anyone of the incumbents was used to deliver.

Set your own standards and live by them. Push the boundaries. Lead by example.

If it doesn’t taste good, you can’t serve it. — Jiro Ono

I’m not surprised that everyone I know is drawn to the companies that produce the best products. Who cares about companies that do mediocre work? I don’t even want to imagine how hard it must be for these companies to attract talent.

Own your Mistakes

A brief conversation about the ideal thinness of a slice

If you carefully watch the interactions and incredibly tight feedback loops of his team you will find that every time someone points out what could have been done better it is acknowledged and immediately executed. No arguing, no rationalization attempts, no excuses.

His team is as motivated to strive for perfection as Jiro himself. If a shortcoming is discovered you will hear a short hai (yes, I understand) and people are back in the flow, striving to do better.

I believe it is an art to separate your own ego from the work you are doing. This is related to something I found in the Heroku values

Strong opinions, weakly held. — Bob Johansen, IFTF Distinguished Fellow

On the one hand you want to be passionate about what you are doing but on the other hand you don’t want to let your ego get in the way of a better solution. You don’t win by being right all the time, you win by identifying things that are great wherever they came from.

Manage Expectations

Jiro’s staff working with dedication. Like a clockwork.

If you apply for a job at Jiro’s sushi bar you know what you are getting yourself into. It will take about 10 years of dedicated work until you’ll be allowed to cook tamagoyaki (egg sushi). It takes a long time of training and personal growth until Jiro considers you a shokunin (master craftsman).

It seems like Jeff Bezos of Amazon also isn’t shy about communicating his expectations

You can work long, hard, or smart, but at Amazon.com you can’t choose two out of three. — Jeff Bezos, CEO Amazon

This is what he told potential recruits back in 1997. In the middle of the dot-com bubble where hiring top talent was extremely difficult and in a climate where other companies were offering ridiculous employee perks.

Taste your own Cooking

Jiro’s staff tasting their own sushi of the day.

Jiro and his staff are constantly preparing and tasting their ingredients and final products. Every day, many times a day.

Eating your own dog food is a great way to get into the shoes of your customers. Many software companies test-drive preview versions of their products internally and or with a tiny fraction of their customer base before they release the changes to everyone.

It is hard to assure quality if you don’t care about how your own food tastes like. Caring more than others is a real competitive advantage. Ingrained in the company culture and incredibly hard to copy.

Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo even refused to get broadband installed at home until the majority of US households got it in order to get an authentic experience of the products she was responsible for (back then at Google).

Your Suppliers are Part of your Team

The local fish market, an essential supplier that enables the quality Jiro strives for.

It makes a lot of sense to regard your suppliers as part of your team. Whether it is the local fish market that enables Jiro to serve the highest quality sushi that is available or the programming languages, libraries and 3rd party services and platforms you use to build and deliver your product.

Companies like Apple take this to the extreme. They tightly work together with their suppliers to help them succeed. Tim Cook ,who led Apple’s operations for many years has built one of the most impressive supply chains of the IT world. Whether it is gorilla glass, CPUs, memory or other essential parts, Apple’s focus on healthy supply chain relationships is one of the reasons they are able to create the products people fall in love with.

Conclusion

Jiro’s infinite passion about creating the perfect sushi is what drives all of the observations I made. Whether it is tightly controlling the supply chain, choosing to only work with the best people (whether that means his staff or his suppliers) or his obsession about helping people grow and enabling them to do their best — Passion is his fuel.

If you find something you really care about, other things tend to fall into place. In the end everyone cares about great products & passion — customers, partners, investors, potential hires and employees.

If you found this post helpful you might want to follow me on twitter where I tweet about Software Development & Product Management :)

Written by

Co-founder, CEO & Product at @blossom_io

Published September 3, 2013Jiro ono of jiro dreams of sushi

Jiro ono of jiro dreams of sushi

What Product Managers can learn from Jiro Ono

Hiring, quality assurance and leadership.

This post is part of the ‘What Product Managers can learn from …’ series. It is also published in the Startup Edition.

Just recently I re-watched Jiro Dreams of Sushi, a wonderful documentary about Jiro Ono, an 85 year old sushi chef from Japan who leads a tiny 8 seat sushi bar located in a Tokyo subway station. It repeatedly got awarded with 3 out of 3 Michelin stars and is known as the best place in the world to get sushi.

I first stumbled upon the documentary a few months back when Jason Evanish published his own recommendation. Since then I’ve seen it a couple of times on various occasions and it always is a true joy to watch.

I believe as Product Managers we all can learn a lot from Jiro, especially when it comes to hard nuts to crack like hiring, quality assurance and leadership …

Strive for Perfection

Who defines when something is ‘good enough’? Who cares?

We live in a world of ‘good enough’. People talk about diminishing returns, finding the sweet spot and 80/20.

We easily forget that in order to create something that truly stands out and delights customers it takes vision, passion and standards that are way beyond ‘standard’.

I would make sushi in my dreams. — Jiro Ono

Often you will have to set your own standards since ‘industry standard’ or being ‘better than the competition’ will cause you to aim way lower than you could.

I feel this is the reason why sometimes whole industries get disrupted by people who are ‘outsiders’ that naively expected way more than anyone of the incumbents was used to deliver.

Set your own standards and live by them. Push the boundaries. Lead by example.

If it doesn’t taste good, you can’t serve it. — Jiro Ono

I’m not surprised that everyone I know is drawn to the companies that produce the best products. Who cares about companies that do mediocre work? I don’t even want to imagine how hard it must be for these companies to attract talent.

Own your Mistakes

A brief conversation about the ideal thinness of a slice

If you carefully watch the interactions and incredibly tight feedback loops of his team you will find that every time someone points out what could have been done better it is acknowledged and immediately executed. No arguing, no rationalization attempts, no excuses.

His team is as motivated to strive for perfection as Jiro himself. If a shortcoming is discovered you will hear a short hai (yes, I understand) and people are back in the flow, striving to do better.

I believe it is an art to separate your own ego from the work you are doing. This is related to something I found in the Heroku values

Strong opinions, weakly held. — Bob Johansen, IFTF Distinguished Fellow

On the one hand you want to be passionate about what you are doing but on the other hand you don’t want to let your ego get in the way of a better solution. You don’t win by being right all the time, you win by identifying things that are great wherever they came from.

Manage Expectations

Jiro’s staff working with dedication. Like a clockwork.

If you apply for a job at Jiro’s sushi bar you know what you are getting yourself into. It will take about 10 years of dedicated work until you’ll be allowed to cook tamagoyaki (egg sushi). It takes a long time of training and personal growth until Jiro considers you a shokunin (master craftsman).

It seems like Jeff Bezos of Amazon also isn’t shy about communicating his expectations

You can work long, hard, or smart, but at Amazon.com you can’t choose two out of three. — Jeff Bezos, CEO Amazon

This is what he told potential recruits back in 1997. In the middle of the dot-com bubble where hiring top talent was extremely difficult and in a climate where other companies were offering ridiculous employee perks.

Taste your own Cooking

Jiro’s staff tasting their own sushi of the day.

Jiro and his staff are constantly preparing and tasting their ingredients and final products. Every day, many times a day.

Eating your own dog food is a great way to get into the shoes of your customers. Many software companies test-drive preview versions of their products internally and or with a tiny fraction of their customer base before they release the changes to everyone.

It is hard to assure quality if you don’t care about how your own food tastes like. Caring more than others is a real competitive advantage. Ingrained in the company culture and incredibly hard to copy.

Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo even refused to get broadband installed at home until the majority of US households got it in order to get an authentic experience of the products she was responsible for (back then at Google).

Your Suppliers are Part of your Team

The local fish market, an essential supplier that enables the quality Jiro strives for.

It makes a lot of sense to regard your suppliers as part of your team. Whether it is the local fish market that enables Jiro to serve the highest quality sushi that is available or the programming languages, libraries and 3rd party services and platforms you use to build and deliver your product.

Companies like Apple take this to the extreme. They tightly work together with their suppliers to help them succeed. Tim Cook ,who led Apple’s operations for many years has built one of the most impressive supply chains of the IT world. Whether it is gorilla glass, CPUs, memory or other essential parts, Apple’s focus on healthy supply chain relationships is one of the reasons they are able to create the products people fall in love with.

Conclusion

Jiro’s infinite passion about creating the perfect sushi is what drives all of the observations I made. Whether it is tightly controlling the supply chain, choosing to only work with the best people (whether that means his staff or his suppliers) or his obsession about helping people grow and enabling them to do their best — Passion is his fuel.

If you find something you really care about, other things tend to fall into place. In the end everyone cares about great products & passion — customers, partners, investors, potential hires and employees.

If you found this post helpful you might want to follow me on twitter where I tweet about Software Development & Product Management :)

Written by